Did we win the race to first harvest? Texas Hill Country Albarino and Vermentino. via /r/wine

Did we win the race to first harvest? Texas Hill Country Albarino and Vermentino.
https://ift.tt/2uIT0Nd

Submitted July 17, 2018 at 07:52PM by Cooper_MHA
via reddit https://ift.tt/2LdW7Y3

Advertisements

Was gifted a lot of wine, curious if there’s anything good. I drink it a bit but don’t know anything about it. Mods, remove if necessary. via /r/wine

Was gifted a lot of wine, curious if there’s anything good. I drink it a bit but don’t know anything about it. Mods, remove if necessary.
https://ift.tt/2JwdRsH

Submitted July 17, 2018 at 06:36PM by gnitsuj
via reddit https://ift.tt/2L2DCqi

Question: what would be a wine label not well-known to the layman but who wine-knowledgeable people would immediately identify as top quality? via /r/wine

Question: what would be a wine label not well-known to the layman but who wine-knowledgeable people would immediately identify as top quality?

I’m writing a story where one of the characters orders a bottle of wine and it would work best for that character if the specific wine was something really high quality, but identifiable just by knowledgeable people. So, I think most everyone agrees that Petrus is top quality wine, and the name Petrus is probably recognized even by people who don’t know much (or anything) about wines. But is there anything that, say, people in this subreddit would know is top level wine but other people wouldn’t?

Submitted July 17, 2018 at 08:04AM by quillboard
via reddit https://ift.tt/2JvzJo3

Blanc de Noir Still Wine Recommendations? via /r/wine

Blanc de Noir Still Wine Recommendations?

Recently saw someone on here drinking a blanc de noir still Malbec and it looked fascinating. Over the weekend, I tried a bottle of the 2017 Left Coast Pinot Noir and I really enjoyed it — interesting mix of stone and red fruit aromas, with a surprisingly creamy mouthfeel.

Just wondering if anyone has any other blanc de noir still wine recommendations, either Pinot Noir or other varietals?

Submitted July 17, 2018 at 09:48AM by mckirdy89
via reddit https://ift.tt/2L2v0zU

My Visit to Comfort, Texas (Bending Branch Winery) via /r/wine

My Visit to Comfort, Texas (Bending Branch Winery)

I visited family in San Antonio, Texas last week. They are members of the wine club at Bending Branch Winery, so we decided to take a trip out to the winery and do a tasting. Wow, it was a great time! The winery is just outside Comfort, about a 45 minute drive from San Antonio (maybe a little longer if you are coming from downtown SA). The drive up is beautiful and so worth it for the wines. The owner had the goal of making Texas wines competitive in the world market and has done a lot of experimentation to make big bold reds out of Texas grapes. Top varieties are Viogner, Roussanne, Tannat, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, Mourvedre, and Petite Sirah. I would highly recommend this winery for anyone looking to try Texas wines – also it has won Best Texas Winery for a few years now from several locations.

Submitted July 17, 2018 at 10:02AM by Ryspy197
via reddit https://ift.tt/2Jw0RDw

Odd questions about a vacation trip via /r/wine

Odd questions about a vacation trip

Hi /r/wine

I need some of your advice, I totally understand this is a broad question and probably most of you are US-based but I'm going to try nevertheless:

In september my GF and I are going to live together after my recent graduation. We've been shopping furniture etc. but a nice vacation is now more than welcomed. We're lucky to live in Belgium, a small country located to the north of France and even more lucky to speak the local language. This gives the opportunity to ask locals for their opinion etc. Now for this trip we want to combine some sunbathing, swimming and buying wine for our new apartment. If you have nice B&B tips for the sunbathing/swimming part that would be lovely but that's definitely not my question.

I wanted to know if any of you can give tips on what region would prefarble to visit. You have the Burgundy region, Bordeaux or even the Provence. I find it difficult to choose between those regions. What are the most important characteristics of this regions?

Secondly: for the 2018 wine we'll be way to early because the harvest only starts towards the end of september if I'm not mistaken? Are the previous years considered to be "good wine years"?

And lastly, as a newbie to the wine world, what makes a wine good for preserving for a few years.

I know this is a lot to ask and very broad but any advice or insights in this matter are more than welcome. I'm looking to get into wines and I think some of your /r/wine have a lot of knowledge about this.

Thanks in advance!

PS: I'm not a native speaker so I'll excuse myself in advance for any grammatical or spelling errors I might have made.

Submitted July 17, 2018 at 03:52AM by Polygoon_BE
via reddit https://ift.tt/2Ljms6Q